When your liver starts to play up most people

come to appreciate the true value of Dandelion (Taraxacum officinale). In herbal medicine the principal function of dandelion is to care for the liver. It does this by promoting the formation of bile and by removing excess water from the body in cases of severe water retention resulting from liver problems.

While influencing the liver, dandelion purifies the blood thereby assisting with conditions such as acne, itchy, scaly rashes and eczema. Long-established herbal practice has advocated the daily ingestion of fresh dandelion as a “spring-cleaning” agent for the body.

Dandelion is one of the best sources of potassium, vital to proper kidney function and muscle tone. It makes an ideally balanced diuretic that may be safely used with great frequency whenever such an action is needed. Fluid retention, due to heart problems can also be countered with dandelion. The herb contains several supportive substances such as choline which will help cope with cholesterol distribution and is useful as a slimming device, diuretic and laxative.

Most Australian gardeners know dandelion as a noxious weed

getting in the way of prettier, more delicate plants. And while it’s true, dandelion is not of Nature’s prettiest creations, it is a fierce fighter in the battle to stay healthy.

However, if  you have your own garden, you can grow your own dandelion.

Dandelion salad, which is rich in vitamins, cleanses, stimulates and assists the liver to do its job. Every spring this delicious salad should be on the table.

One of the derivations of the plant’s name is the similarity the vicious looking leaf bears to lion’s teeth and, in a number of countries dandelion is called lion’s tooth! The ball of seeds from which the plant propagates and which children all over the world have used in a variety of games – from telling the time to discovering how many boyfriends or girlfriends one had – is responsible for the rather unflattering name of swine’s snout as well as the more appropriate blow ball.

For liver disorders, the following recipe is recommended:

Weigh the listed herbs into a bowl and mix them well. Store the herbal mixture in a glass jar away from sun light. Prepare the tea as a hot infusion and drink three to four cups daily.